The White House achievement list omits important details about gas prices and inflation

The White House released a list of President Biden’s accomplishments on Wednesday, but omitted key details about his track record on gasoline prices and inflation.

White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain and other top officials posted the list on Twitter in an effort to prepare Americans for political talks with relatives during the holiday. The list cited recent declines in gas prices, “mitigating” inflation and Biden’s work “undoing supply chains to lower the cost of goods” as top achievements.

“One last item for your Thanksgiving dinner: some talking points when ‘that uncle’ ‘comes on you’ [Biden]Klain tweeted.

At the top of the performance chart, the White House notes that gas prices have fallen by $1.35 per gallon since June.

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However, the list fails to mention that gas prices had risen nationwide to a record above $5 a gallon during Biden’s presidency in June. In addition, the current average gas price of $3.61 per gallon remains 51% higher than the average pump price at the end of January 2021, when Biden took office, according to the Energy Information Administration.

In addition, the list does not address other energy prices, which continue to rise across the country. For example, heating oil is up 58.1%, gas supplies from utilities are up 33.1% and electricity prices are up 15.5% year-on-year, recent data from the Department of Labor showed.

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“For consumers, the problem is that a lot of people think that because gasoline prices have gone down, the cost of home energy has gone down, too, which isn’t true,” Mark Wolfe, executive director of the National Energy Assistance Directors Association, previously told FOX Business. .

“They are different fuels and different dynamics,” he continued. “So, as we head into winter, for families that have been struggling with very high inflation over the past year, this is another issue that’s going to fall.”

turkey feast

Thanksgiving meals are expected to be 20% more expensive than last year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. (Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images/Getty Images)

The list also contains misleading information about inflation and higher consumer prices, suggesting that prices are falling.

In October, the most recent month for which data is available, the consumer price index rose 7.7% year on year, close to the all-time high of the main inflation measure. Over the summer, the index climbed 9.1%, the biggest increase in four decades.

Also, Thanksgiving meals are expected to cost 20% more this year than last year due to inflation. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFB), such a rise in food prices would lead to the most expensive Thanksgiving since the group began tracking holiday prices 37 years ago.

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“Global inflation lowering consumers’ purchasing power is a major contributing factor to the increase in the average cost of this year’s Thanksgiving dinner,” Roger Cryan, AFB’s chief economist, said this week.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

FOX Business reporter Megan Henney contributed to this report.

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