Hurricane Fiona likely to hit Atlantic Canada as intense post-tropical storm

Hurricane Fiona could turn into a severe storm for parts of Atlantic Canada this weekend.

The hurricane will track northwards and into the Maritimes late Friday and Saturday as it transitions into a post-tropical storm.

That post-tropical transition doesn’t mean the storm will be weaker, but its structure will change. It will grow in size and cover even more territory.

While the “cone of uncertainty” is still quite large, it is getting smaller every day. Forecast models continue to project landfall over Cape Breton or the eastern mainland of Nova Scotia.

While there is still some uncertainty about the track and other details, the potential effects are becoming increasingly apparent.

The rain comes well before Fiona. A cold front pouring in from the west will bring its own rain through Thursday and Friday, then begin tapping moisture from Fiona.

Hurricane Fiona will track northwards and into the Maritimes late Friday and Saturday as it transitions into a post-tropical storm. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

The heaviest rain is expected as Fiona continues Friday night and Saturday.

Due to the continuing heavy rainfall there is a risk of flooding, especially along and to the left of the track. Precipitation amounts in those areas can reach 100-150 millimeters, or even more.

With the storm increasing in size, very strong winds are expected over a large area. With the trees in full leaf, the power outage potential will be high.

The latest forecast models for Hurricane Fiona’s landfall over Cape Breton or the eastern mainland of Nova Scotia. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

The heaviest rain is expected as Fiona continues Friday night and Saturday, with a risk of flooding in some areas. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

Widespread gusts in excess of 100 mph are likely over central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, PEI, and western and southwestern Newfoundland. In these areas gusts can reach 130 km/h, especially in exposed coastal areas.

Wind gusts of more than 70 km/h also seem possible in areas further west.

In central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island, widespread wind gusts in excess of 100 km/h are likely to be possible. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

Storm surge is also likely. The impact will be highly dependent on the track and timing of the storm and how it coincides with high tide. Stay tuned for more details.

It’s time to prepare. Make sure your emergency kit is ready to go and your propane tank is topped up. Check that your downspouts and downspouts are clean and make sure your sump pump and generator are in good working order.

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