Dentist says she can tell patients they are PREGNANT just by looking in their mouths

The gums don’t lie! Dentist Says She Can Tell Patients They’re PREGNANT Just By Looking Into Their Mouths (Thanks To This Telltale Sign)

  • Sukhmani Singh, who is known as @thatdentalgal on TikTok, shared in a now-viral video how she can often see during an exam that a patient is pregnant
  • She explained that many mothers-to-be develop pregnancy gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums caused by hormonal changes
  • Singh shared that ‘gums become more inflamed, sensitive and prone to bleeding’
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that nearly 60% to 75% of pregnant women have gingivitis
  • Without treatment, the gums can become inflamed and teeth can become loose
  • Periodontitis, a serious gum disease that can lead to tooth loss, has been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, including preterm birth

A dentist has revealed how to tell her patients they’re pregnant during an exam — and it’s all about the gums.

Sukhmani Singh, who is known as @thatdentalgal on TikTok, opened up about the telltale sign in the third installment of her ongoing video series “Things Your Dentist Can Tell About You Just By Looking Into Your Mouth.”

“Your dentist may be able to tell you’re pregnant,” she explained. “This is not only due to the nausea and erosion of the enamel, but also something called pregnancy gingivitis.”

Dentist Sukhmani Singh, known as @thatdentalgal on TikTok, shared how she can often tell if her patients are pregnant just by looking in their mouths

She explained that many mothers-to-be develop pregnancy gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums caused by hormonal changes

She explained that many mothers-to-be develop pregnancy gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums caused by hormonal changes

Pregnancy gingivitis is inflammation of the gums caused by hormonal changes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The surge of hormones can make the gums more susceptible to plaque buildup, which can build up along the gum line and lead to gingivitis.

“Gums become more inflamed, sensitive and prone to bleeding,” Singh explained of the symptoms that may indicate pregnancy gingivitis.

“Did you know this?” she asked in the caption.

Singh said that

Singh said that “gums become more inflamed, sensitive and prone to bleeding.” Without treatment, the gums can become inflamed and the teeth can become loose

Singh’s video has been viewed more than 714,000 times since it was posted in May 2021, with some viewers understandably shocked.

“Okay um, I noticed my gums were bleeding three weeks ago, but I also changed the head of my electric toothbrush. I’m going crazy right now,” one TikTok user wrote in the comments.

“I’m scared,” someone else admitted. “My gums are like balloons in places and my dentist hasn’t mentioned a word about it…”

Another added: “Not that I check my teeth in the mirror after watching this video.”

Periodontitis, a serious gum disease that can lead to tooth loss, has been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, although the link is not yet fully understood

Periodontitis, a serious gum disease that can lead to tooth loss, has been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, although the link is not yet fully understood

Singh advises people who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to talk to their dentist about keeping gingivitis or periodontitis 'well controlled'

Singh advises people who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to talk to their dentist about keeping gingivitis or periodontitis 'well controlled'

Singh advises people who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to talk to their dentist about keeping gingivitis or periodontitis ‘well controlled’

Other commenters shared how they had similar issues with their gums and teeth when they were pregnant.

‘My gums bled so bad during pregnancy!!’ one woman remembered. “They were extra careful during my brushing because even the slightest touch caused so much blood loss!”

Another TikTok user said she’s newly pregnant and “can’t eat or drink anything warm” because her “gums are so sore.”

“I’m trying to conceive and my dentist told me today that she thinks I’m pregnant…I hope she’s right!!!” someone else noticed.

Singh's video has been viewed more than 714,000 times since it was posted in May 2021, with some viewers understandably shocked

Singh’s video has been viewed more than 714,000 times since it was posted in May 2021, with some viewers understandably shocked

The CDC estimates that nearly 60 to 75 percent of pregnant women have gingivitis. Without treatment, the gums can become inflamed and the teeth can become loose.

Periodontitis, a serious gum disease that can lead to tooth loss, has been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, although the link is not yet fully understood.

Some studies have shown that pregnant women with periodontal disease are at greater risk of low birth weight [and] premature babies,” Singh explained in an earlier video.

“Scientists believe the cause of this is that periodontal disease can increase the amount of prostaglandins circulating in your body. Prostaglandins play a key role in the delivery process, telling the body it’s time to give birth.’

Singh advises people who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to talk to their dentist about keeping their gingivitis or periodontitis going.well controlled and well managed.’

WHAT IS PREGNANCY GINGIVITIS?

Pregnancy gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums that causes redness, swelling, and tenderness.

Hormonal changes can make the gums more susceptible to plaque buildup, which can build up along the gum line and lead to gingivitis.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that nearly 60 to 75 percent of pregnant women have gingivitis.

Without treatment, the gums can become inflamed and the teeth can become loose.

Periodontitis, a serious gum disease that can lead to tooth loss, has been linked to poor pregnancy outcomes, including preterm birth and low birth weight, although the link is not yet fully understood.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

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